What to do with lemon peels? Don’t toss them; put them to work.

Lemon juice is about 5 to 6 percent citric acid and has a pH level of between 2 and 3. This low pH acidity makes lemon juice a great ally in breaking down rust and mineral stains, but gentle enough to not dull finishes. There is generally sufficient juice left in used lemon halves to tackle small tasks, and it all comes with its own applicator (the rind itself).

Plus, the oil in the peel is perfect for clever culinary applications, and not bad in the beauty department either. Here’s what you can do:

AROUND THE HOUSE

1. Clean greasy messes
Greasy pans? Splattered stove tops? Messy counters? If your kitchen has been the victim of some sloppy sauteing, try using lemon halves before bringing out possibly toxic chemical cleaners. Sprinkle some salt (for abrasion) on a juiced lemon half and rub on the greasy areas, wipe up with a towel. (Be careful using lemon on marble counter tops, or any other surface which may be sensitive to acid).

2. Clean your tea kettle or coffee pot
For mineral deposit build up in your tea kettle, fill the kettle with water, add a handful of thin slices of lemon peel and bring to a boil. Turn off heat and let sit for an hour, drain, and rinse well. For coffee pots, add ice, salt and lemon rinds to the empty pot; swish and swirl for a minute or two, dump, and rinse. Hello, sparkly.

3. Clean your microwave
All it takes is one exploding bowl of food to render the interior of your microwave officially gunked, sometimes gunked with cement-like properties. Rather than using strong chemical cleaners, try this: Add lemon rinds to a microwave-safe bowl filled halfway with water. Cook on high for 5 minutes, allowing the water to boil and the steam to condense on the walls and tops of the oven. Carefully remove the hot bowl and wipe away the mess with a towel.

4. Deodorize the garbage disposal
Use lemon peels to deodorize the garbage disposal (and make your kitchen smell awesome at the same time). It is a great way to finally dispose of spent lemon peels after you have used them for any of these applications.

5. Polish chrome
Mineral deposits on chrome faucets and other tarnished chrome make haste in the presence of lemon–rub with a squeezed lemon half, rinse, and lightly buff with a soft cloth.

6. Polish copper
A halved lemon dipped in salt or baking powder can also be used to brighten copper cookware, as well as brass, chrome, or stainless steel. Dip a juiced lemon half in salt (you also use baking soda or cream of tartar for the salt) and rub on the affected area. Let it stay on for 5 minutes. Then rinse in warm water and polish dry.

7. Clean a stainless steel sink
Use the same method described to polish chrome, applied to any stainless sink.

8. Keep insects out
Many pests abhor the acid in lemon. You can chop of the peels and place them along thresholds, windowsills, and near any cracks or holes where ants or pests may be entering. For other ways to combat pests naturally, see 7 Steps to Chemical-Free Pest Control.

9. Make a scented humidifier
If your home suffers from dry heat in the winter, you can put lemon peels in a pot of water and simmer on the lowest stove-top setting to humidify and scent the air.

10. Refresh cutting boards
Because of lemon’s low pH, it has antibacterial properties that make is a good choice for refreshing cutting boards. After proper disinfecting (see: How to Clean Your Cutting Board) give the surface a rub with a halved lemon, let sit for a few minutes, and rinse.

TO EAT

11. Keep brown sugar soft
If your brown sugar most often turns into brick sugar, try adding some lemon peel (with traces of pulp and pith removed) to help keep it moist and easy to use. (For all recipes using lemon peel, try to use organic lemons–and scrub the peel well to remove any residues and wax.)

12. Make zest
Zest is the best! Zest is simply grated peel, and is the epitome of lemon essence–it can be used fresh, dried, or frozen. If you don’t have an official zester, you can use the smallest size of a box grater. (If you know you will be using lemons for zest, it is easier to grate the zest from the lemon before juicing them.) To dry zest, spread it on a towel and leave out until dried, then store in a jar. To freeze, use a freezer-safe container. Use zest in salads, marinades, baked goods, grain dishes, etc.

13. Make Vegan Lemon Biscotti
Once you’ve made some zest, make these Vegan Lemon Biscotti cookies. De-li-cious!

INGREDIENTS
6 ounces silken tofu
1 cup organic sugar (or try Sucanat)
1/3 cup extra light olive oil
Zest of 2 lemons
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon vanilla
2 cups all-purpose flour (you can replace half with whole wheat flour if you like)
1 cup semolina flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup chopped almonds
1/2 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 375F degrees.

– In a food processor or blender, combine tofu, sugar, oil, zest, lemon juice, and vanilla.
– In a large bowl, whisk together the flours, baking soda, baking powder, almonds, and salt.
– Stir tofu mixture into flour mixture.
– On an oiled cookie sheet, form dough into two 12-inch long logs.
– Bake for 25 minutes.
– Remove from oven and cool on counter for 15 minutes.
– Reduce oven temperature to 300 F.
– Slice logs into 1/2-inch slices and lay slices flat on ungreased cookie sheets.
– Bake for 40 minutes, turning cookies once after 20 minutes. Additional cooking time may be added for an even crunchier cookie.

14. Make twists
Strips of peel, aka twists, are good in cocktails, sparkling water, and tap water. Use a vegetable peeler to make long strips, or use a knife and cut the peel into long strips, cutting away the white pith which is bitter. These can also be frozen in a freezer-safe container or bag.

15. Make lemon extract powder
Make zest or twists (above) making sure to remove any of the white (bitter) pith–and dry the strips skin-side down on a plate until they’re dried, about 3 or 4 days. Put in a blender (or spice grinder) and pulverize into a powder. Use the powdered peel in place of extract or zest in recipes.

16. Make Lemon Sugar
You can make lemon extract powder (see above) and add it to sugar, or you can use fresh twists, put them in a jar with sugar and let the peel’s oil infuse the sugar.

17. Make Lemon Pepper
Mix lemon extract powder (see above) with freshly cracked pepper.

18. Make Candied Lemon Peel
Orange or grapefruit peel can be candied too. Yum. Candied peels are pretty easy to make, and can be eaten plain, or dipped in melted chocolate, used in cake, cookie, candy, or bread recipes. These recipes for candied citrus and ginger use Sucanat, the most wholesome sugar you can buy.

Candied or Crystallized Citrus Fruit and Ginger
By Annie B. Bond

These beautiful and flavorful confections make very festive homemade gifts. Those who like a low-fat diet tend to be particularly delighted with these fat-free taste sensations.

CANDIED GINGER
Mellow yet poignant, candied ginger is a holiday treat that is also renowned for soothing an upset stomach.

Ingredients
1/3 pound fresh ginger root
enough water to cover
1 cup Sucanat (the most whole, organic sugar)

Peel the ginger using a vegetable peeler, or scrape off the skin with a knife. Slice the ginger into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Julienne the slices if desired, or leave coin-shaped. Place the ginger in a saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil over medium heat and simmer for 30 minutes, or until the ginger is tender. Drain and cool.

Combine the ginger and sugar in a saucepan, with four tablespoons of water. Bring the mixture slowly to a full boil, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved. Simmer for 10 minutes (the ginger should become transparent, and the syrup almost boiled away), stirring occasionally. Remove the pan from the heat, and using a slotted spoon, remove the ginger, toss it in a bowl with Sucanat to lightly coat, and place on a drying rack.

CANDIED CITRUS
The tangy flavor of candied grapefruit peel is particularly unusual and good. A little bit of this candy goes a long way.

Ingredients
2 cups organic grapefruit, orange, lime or lemon peel
1/2 cup Sucanat (the most whole, organic sugar)
water

Combine the citrus peel and 1 1/2 cups water in a saucepan. Bring the mixture slowly to a full boil, stirring constantly until the sugar has dissolved. Simmer for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Repeat three to four times using fresh water each time. Remove the pan from the heat, and using a slotted spoon, remove the peels. Meanwhile, for each cup of peel make a syrup of 1/4 cup of water to 1/2 cup of sugar. Add peel and boil until all the syrup is absorbed and teh peel is transparent. Toss them in a bowl with Sucanat to lightly coat, and place on a drying rack.

FOR BEAUTY

19. Lighten age spots
Many folk remedies suggest using lemon peel to help lighten age spots–apply a small piece to the affected area and leave on for an hour. You can also try one of these 5 natural ways to lighten age spots.

20. Soften dry elbows
Use a half lemon sprinkled with baking soda on elbows, just place your elbow in the lemon and twist the lemon (like you are juicing it) for several minutes. Rinse and dry.

21. Use on your skin
Lemon peels can be very lightly rubbed on your face for a nice skin tonic, then rinse. (And be careful around your eyes.)

22. Make a sugar scrub
Mix 1/2 a cup of sugar with finely chopped lemon peel and enough olive oil to make a paste. Wet your body in the shower, turn off the water and massage sugar mix all over your skin, rinse, be soft! You can also try any of these 5 simple homemade sugar scrubs as well.

Author & Source: Melissa Breyer, care2.com
Shared by: Nutrition Solution Lifestyle -excellent info found there, check them out.

Whats YOUR favorite way to use lemon peel?

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One Response to “22 Uses of Lemon Peels”

  1. Bill Lee Says:

    Thank you Lisa this is very informative.

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